FAQs

1. WHERE ARE THE TOILETS AND LEFT LUGGAGE?

Toilets are available from 6.30am onwards at the Pavilion in City Park, which is adjacent to the Registration Desk.

There are no showers.

Kit bags can be left at the Left Luggage stand next to the Registration Desk.

2. WHERE DO I GET MY TIMING CHIP, NUMBER AND PINS?

At the Registration Desk.

3. WHERE IS THE REGISTRATION DESK AND LEFT LUGGAGE?

The registration desk is open from 7.45am till 1pm adjacent to the Pavilion, that is, between the Mirror Pool and the entrance to the Magistrates Court. The Left Luggage is alongside. Note: the Mirror Pool will be drained on the day to enable full access into this area.

4. WHEN DOES THE RUN START AND END?

The Kids’ Run starts at 9.15am, the Half-marathon at 9.40 and the 5K & 10K at 9.50 on Godwin Street, behind the Starting Arch. Runners need to be in their starting areas by 9.05, 9.30 and 9.40 respectively, so they can receive final instructions from the race directors.

The first Kids Runners will be finished around 9.20, and the first 5K runners could be finished as early as 10.05. The first 10K runners could be finished by 10.20 and the first half-marathon runners at 10.50.

The last runners from the half-marathon will be finished by 12.30 at the latest. Indeed no runner will be allowed through the Starting Arch onto their final lap after 11.50.

5. WHERE ARE THE BEST VANTAGE POINTS TO SEE THE RUNNERS

The virtue of this course is that it allows many excellent points where an onlooker can see a runner twice or more times each lap. Three of the best points are:

(i) The length of Thornton Road, about 500 yards. You can see runners both going out on their lap, and as they return with less than a half a mile before the end.

(ii) Along Great Horton Road by the University. Here you can see runners heading for the U-turn near the junction of Claremont and Great Horton Road; plus, naturally, the runners returning in the opposite direction after the hairpin. You will get a good sight as they slow and accelerate at this turn. In addition, if you move just 50-100 yards down Great Horton Road you will see your favourite runners just over a kilometre further along their run, as they now come up Great Horton Road to turn into Richmond Road and weave through the university campus.

(iii) Around City Park. Here you have a good view of the start and finish. Plus you can move to see runners coming back, with 650m still to run, as they turn from Thornton Road into Princes Way. In a couple of minutes you will see them again, their having circuited the back of the Magistrates Court and come into the open space of City Park.

6. ARE THERE ANY REFRESHMENTS?

For the runners during the race there is a Drinks Station two-thirds of the way round each lap, on the University Campus.

In City Park there are catering and hot drinks concessions, plus a range of shops and cafes circling City Park.

7. WHAT ABOUT WARM-UPS?

An aerobic warm-up will take place at 9.15 in the Mirror Pool area in City Park.

If runners want to jog round the course, they can do this from 8.00am onwards, when the roads will be closed. They should pay attention in case the road closure is still a “work in progress”. They can also do strides and other exercises along Thornton Road which is straight, wide and flat, and very close to the Starting Arch (and the Left Luggage and toilets at City Park). Note: if runners warm up ahead of the Start Gantry, they must NOT attempt to enter the start areas under the gantry itself, as crossing the timing mat in this manner may activate their timing chip inaccurately.

8. IS THE DISTANCE ACCURATE?

Yes, each lap, including the final lap and the half-marathon loop of 1097.5m have been officially measured by UK Athletics official measurers. Each lap is 5000m.

The kilometre markers should also be accurate, if correctly positioned according to the measurer’s specifications.

However, official measurers are obliged to take the shortest possible line between two spots; in a windy course it is impossible for a human to take this shortest line. With over 30 bends on this course, some hairpins and many right-angles, the additional distance that someone will run, compared with the “shortest possible line” could be as much as 150m per lap.

9. I HAVE AN IMPAIRMENT OR A HEALTH ISSUE?

Several runners with visual impairments are running with a guide runner. Others are running as part of a disabled group. Other runners notified the organisers on the online-entry that they have high blood-pressure or other potential medical conditions.

All runners are strongly advised to make a note of any health conditions, allergies and suchlike, and write them on the reverse of their race number. This can include next-of-kin should the organisers need to contact a friend or family member for them.

If the runner has an ailment before, during or after the race they should be directed immediately to the nearest First Aid point (Mirror Pool or University). If they are unable to get there under their own steam, contact the First Aid people directly and inform them of the situation and try to get the First Aid experts to resolve the situation rather than you.

10. I HAVE A BAD NIGGLE BEFORE THE RACE, OR A NASTY PAIN AFTERWARDS?

A qualified sports masseur, Pete May, has a stall near to the Registration Desk. Ask him for a leg-rub before or after the race. If, after the race, the niggle is bad, you can ask him for a diagnosis. This service is free (though any follow-up appointments will be chargeable).

11. THIS WAS FANTASTIC, HOW CAN I GET MORE INVOLVED IN THE SPORT?

See www.sportsshare.org or contact Simon Forde on simon.sportsshare@gmail.com. Or speak to any of the marshals. Better still, check out some of the information at the Registration Desk from some of the local clubs.

12. I HAVE A COMPLAINT ABOUT ANOTHER RUNNER

Ask the runner to report the issue (ideally with them having taken note of the other runner’s number) to the Race Director. Note that the Event Rules were notified to everyone by the online-entry company, Racebest, when the runners registered, and the rules are on the event website. So it is their obligation to have known the Event Rules and to have abided by them. Any infringement renders a runner liable to disqualification (though only on grounds specified in the Rules).

13. I HAVE A COMPLAINT OR PROBLEM ABOUT THE COURSE OR HOW THE RACE WAS CONDUCTED

Ask the runner to report the issue to the Race Director. Let the complainant know that if they don’t think it can be or has been satisfactorily resolved by the Race Director, they should, if necessary, ensure that the matter is logged and reported to the Race Referee.

14. I DID NOT COMPLETE THE FULL DISTANCE FOR MY RACE

If a runner fails to complete the numbers of laps (e.g. does 1 lap instead of 2 for the 10k) this will probably appear as a fault in the results, since most runners’ split times will be registered when they pass the Start map each lap.

If a Half-marathon runner has not done the extra loop on Lap 1, they will only have completed 20K instead of 21,097.5m. They should notify the Time-keepers immediately.

In all cases, they should inform the Time-keepers immediately, to see whether the results can be amended, or to see if the time-keepers can prevent them from being disqualified.

15. IS A REFUND POSSIBLE IF I DON’T COMPLETE THE RACE OR CANNOT TAKE PART?

The normal policy is no. However, the Race Director has discretion to make exceptions based upon exceptional circumstances. The runner should speak with the Race Director now and, if necessary, put their case in writing later.

16. WHAT HAPPENS IF THE RACE IS CANCELLED OR POSTPONED.

In the case of a cancellation, the organisers will normally provide a full refund. In the case of a postponement, the organisers will notify everyone of the alternative date at the earliest possible moment. If the race is forced to stop due to an emergency or other “act of God” (force majeure, in legal language), that is, something which is out of the control of the organisers, the organisers will do their best to re-arrange the race at an alternative date.

The precise policy is stated in section 9 above. In any case the organisers will email every competitor as soon as possible with the proposed new arrangements.

17. WHAT DO I DO IF A MARSHAL, STEWARD OR OTHER OFFICIAL ORDERS ME TO DO SOMETHING?

You are obliged, by the Event Rules, to follow all orders of marshals, stewards or other event officials.

In the case of an emergency, the Traffic Management Company (Green Light) will stop the race; runners must cease running, and should make their way safely back to a safe spot near City Park, following instructions from the Traffic Management Company and any junction stewards.

See further Section 8 above.

18. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A JUNCTION STEWARD AND A RACE MARSHAL?

Race marshals are volunteers, almost all from local running clubs. Their responsibility is ensuring that the race is run smoothly and fairly, that no-one goes the wrong way, there are no conflicting movements between runners, and that the race is completed safely.

Junction stewards are paid staff, responsible for ensuring that no traffic encroaches onto the race course. They are placed typically at barriered or coned-off junctions and are mainly focused on vehicles and pedestrians.

19. IS THE RACE LICENSED AND INSURED?

Yes, the race has an official licence through the national governing body, UK Athletics. Paperwork and the licence document is available for inspection with the Race Director.

The race itself is insured under Bradford Metropolitan Council’s public liability insurance (with Zurich Municipal, policy QLA-03GO32-0223; expiry 31 March 2014). Documentation is available for inspection upon request.

20. WHAT DO I DO WITH MY TIMING CHIP?

Before the race, affix it firmly so that there is no chance of it falling off or coming loose. Do not go near the timing-mats at the Starting Arch, in case you accidentally activate your chip.

After you have passed through the Finishing Arch at the end of the race, take the chip off, and place it in the collection box just through the Finish. Runners will be prompted to do this.

21. WHAT ARE THE PRIZES AND MEMENTOS?

Each runner gets a technical t-shirt. These can be collected straight through the finish area. There are enough t-shirts for everyone in the size that they ordered when they registered.

There are £1200 worth of prizes, in vouchers from SportsShoes. The first three finishers in each race (5K, 10K and Half-Marathon) will be awarded their prize in City Park. Other category winners(first three in each of the Open age, over-35s, over-45s, over-55s, and over-65s, both men and women) will have their prizes posted next week.

In addition there are spot prizes available to all finishers.

22. WHERE AND WHEN IS THE PRIZE-GIVING? AND WHO IS DOING IT?

The prizes to the first three finishers, men and women, of the 5K and 10K will have their prizes awarded by the Lord Mayor of Bradford Councillor Khadim Hussain, at 10.30 in City Park. The first three finishers, men and women, for the Half-Marathon will receive their prizes similarly at 11.15.

If a runner is unsure if they are in the top three, they should ask the Time-keepers.

23. WHO IS BENEFITING FINANCIALLY FROM THE REGISTRATION FEES?

A large part of the entry fees go to the official charity, the Telegraph & Argus Bradford Crocus Cancer Appeal.

In addition to the Crocus Appeal, the event organisers work closely with two other local charities, Sue Ryder and Epilepsy Action. Both these charities are heavily committed to athletics in Bradford, as you can see by Sue Ryder organising the BIGK 10K each Mothering Sunday in Keighley, and Epilepsy Action organising the Bradford 10K each spring in Bradford.

Incidental fees raised from other sources (e.g. renting stalls during the event) will be donated to the Lord Mayor’s Charity.

24. WHY ARE THE FEES HIGHER THAN RACES ORGANISED BY CLUBS?

Road races which involve road closures are extremely complex, involving negotiations with a range of public bodies (Highways, Council, public transport operators, police). And, due to the health-and-safety requirements, professional traffic management organisations need to be bought in to manage the risk assessments, road closures, and the traffic management on the day. In addition, a host of paid-for stewards are required to staff barriers or roads which are being closed.

The flip-side is that with such requirements it becomes increasingly impossible for clubs to organise races on public roads without costly professional partners. Hence the increase in trail and off-road races.

25. THE MARSHALS AND RACE OFFICIALS ARE ALL FROM LOCAL RUNNING CLUBS. WHAT’S IN IT FOR THEM?

The marshals and race officials are indeed all volunteers. The Race Referee and Race Director receive small fees according to national guidelines. A donation of £1000 will be paid to the Bradford Athletics Network in recognition of all the work done by the Race Organisers and the marshals and other club volunteers.

In addition, depending on how the overall event budget looks in December, when all bills have been paid, some contingency money has been set aside for a number of projects to promote athletics across Bradford district, in particular:

(i) an athletics academy open to all 14 to 25-year-olds, whether in education, training, in work or seeking work.

(ii) development of facilities across the district, including completing and refurbishing tracks in Keighley and Horsfall, and permanent training routes across the district.

(iii) an activator to promote the establishment of new informal running groups through the Run England programme, and linking new or existing groups to nearby clubs.

26. WHY DO CLUB RUNNERS PAY LESS THAN OTHERS?

This is a requirement for any race licensed by UK Athletics. UK Athletics sets the terms of the licence and minimum standards for any race organised under the “Run Britain” banner.

More specifically, the national governing body of the sport in England, England Athletics, is almost entirely run through government grants and through annual capitation fees on registered club runners. But the vast majority of the work to keep the sport functioning in the UK is undertaken by club members on a voluntary basis. One of the few incentives to be a club member and to pay a licence fee to England Athletics is the race discount that they receive.

27. CAN I MAKE A DONATION TO ANY OF THE CHARITIES OR GET INVOLVED IN ANY OF THEIR FUTURE ACTIVITIES?

Yes, speak to one of their reps at the Registration Desk.

28. WHEN IS THE NEXT SUCH RACE?

There are 3-4 races each week in the Bradford area, so there is no shortage. If you prefer big city-centre races, the next ones in Bradford district are the BigK 10K in Keighley on Mothering Sunday, and the Epilepsy Action Bradford 10K next spring.

The organisers of these two events will notify you of these races, using the competitors’ lists from this race.

If you really have the bug, the best solution is to join one of the local clubs. Annual membership is typically only £15 of £20, and you can then take part in club-only events each week, which cost as little as £3 or £5. The best news is that you don’t have to be a Kenyan to join.

29. ANY OTHER QUESTIONS?

Please contact the event organisers.

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